An analysis of differences in character development of beowulf and grendel

Beowulf displays a different kind of hero with each monster he seeks out, such as Grendel and the Dragon. He showed a hero who was truly fighting for protection of his people, the people he cared about.

He faces that reality by showing no fear and preparing for a positive or a fatal outcome. Huge and exceedingly strong, Beowulf is cold and mechanical, showing little emotion or personality.

Although his fight still took courage from him, the dragon who represented all evil, brought on a different hero in Beowulf, a hero who was truly fighting for protection of his people, the people he cared about.

In Grendel, he is a lonely creature who seeks an understanding of the seemingly meaningless world around him. Although he is fighting this monster because he is protecting people, the fight with this outcast is easy to him, and brings him to the height of his courage. Read an in-depth analysis of The Shaper.

Beowulf acknowledges that he needs help and protection and is no longer at the height of his courage. In Grendel, Gardner calls this stereotypical thinking about heroes and monsters into question.

Although with both fights he claims he is protecting the people, the second fight shows that he portrays more Viking-like courage. His final words ultimately prove his is very Viking in the fight with the dragon compared to the fight with Grendel where he needed a trophy to display his heroism.

Fate will unwind as it must! For Beowulf to seek out the fight with the dragon is absurd because it may seem that he is fighting the dragon to prove he is courageous just like he was with Grendel and to boost his confidence.

What Is the Difference Between Beowulf and Grendel?

Grendel appears as just an outcast, a god-cursed being, and something that is just a nuisance to the people. In Beowulf, Hrothgar is an exemplary model of kingship, but in Grendel he is more flawed and human. He remembers the young hero he once was, and addresses how courageous and confident he was.

Gardner remakes Grendel from the Anglo-Saxon incarnation of blind evil, unthinking and senseless, to a conscious, rational force, and Beowulf from a honorable, courageous, and epitome of goodness, to a irrational, psychotic, cold blooded killer.

When Grendel denies Unferth the opportunity to embody those ideals, he becomes a bitter and broken man. He is a mix of man and beast; his fury is based on very human feelings of resentment and jealousy.

He is able to use his super-human physical strength and courage to put his people before himself. Grendel was just a nuisance who he needed to get rid of. Hrothgar plans to marry Freawaru off to Ingeld in order to avoid a war with the Heathobards.

The ogre is vulnerable because Beowulf uses no weapons, and the hero has the strength of 30 men in his grip. In many ways, Grendel is the most interesting character in the epic. He devours some of the dead on the spot and carries others back to his lair, the cave he shares with his mother beneath a mere in a dark fen.

Grendel has no chance after that. Originally a Helming princess, Wealtheow represents love, altruism, and an ideal image of womanhood, bringing balance and harmony to her adopted community. Beowulf knows he will come back alive.

In the epic poem, the characters are basically static, and their actions are predictable. He shows that even with his own death, that he has done well because his people are awarded with treasure, not just him.

Grendel is envious, resentful, and angry toward mankind, possibly because he feels that God blesses them but that the ogre himself never can be blessed. Grendel often describes his war with the humans as a personal battle between Hrothgar and himself. He is still courageous, but has a level head about this fight.

In Beowulf by Seamus Heaney, Beowulf is a hero who faces two different kinds of monsters, Grendel and the Dragon, where his character development is completely different from one to the other. She desperately tries to protect Grendel from the humans and his fate.

When Beowulf is called to fight Grendel he portrays himself as confidant and a man with no fear but still makes it clear he is fighting for protect people.Character Analysis Grendel Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List Cain's name in Hebrew is Qayin, meaning "creature," and, according to legend, the monsters of the earth are his descendants.

In Beowulf by Seamus Heaney, Beowulf is a hero who faces two different kinds of monsters, Grendel and the Dragon, where his character development is completely different from one to the other.

Each monster he faces represents different meanings to him. Character Analysis. Aeschere: He is the dear friend and chief advisor of King Hrothgar. He is the man who is killed brutally by Grendel's mother.

It is his bloody head that Grendel's mother leaves sitting on the edge of a cliff as a sign of her revenge. Beowulf. Difference of Character Development in Beowulf and Grendel.

Difference of Character Development in Beowulf and Grendel Essay

The main difference between the Anglo-Saxon poem, Beowulf, and John Gardner’s modern retelling, Grendel, lies in the development of the characters. In the epic poem, the characters are basically static, and their actions are predictable.

Analysis The Development In Romeos. In the Old English epic poem, Beowulf is the name of a heroic warrior from Scandinavia who journeys to Denmark to assist the king, and Grendel is the monster with which he does battle.

After chronicling the struggle between Beowulf and Grendel, the poem goes on to tell the tale of the rest of. Grendel Character Analysis Essay Words Apr 7th, 4 Pages Grendel character analysis Terrorizing a town for 12 years Grendel kills countless men and woman in the epic of Beowulf.

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An analysis of differences in character development of beowulf and grendel
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